Carte de Sejour, Finally! BUT…

February 26, 2013. That’s the date the eternally angry lady at the sous-prefecture slid my French carte de sejour across a desk–her brows wrinkled and lips tight–and turned away without so much as an aurevoir. I picked up the newly minted, crisp piece of plastic with my photo and French credentials, smiled wide enough to catch the attention of the soured fonctionnaire, and kissed my card with a loud “smack.”

No reaction. No smile. No felicitations. Nothing. Not even a nod in my direction.

But her bad day, bad year (I suspect, bad life), could not spoil my moment. I had waited nearly two years for this day, and I was finally holding, in my hands, an official piece of plastic that identified me as a resident of France.

If you’re not familiar with the carte de sejour, you have no idea of the power it holds for an étranger. With this card, I can finally get health insurance (sécurité sociale), declare myself as an autoentrepreneur (self-employed), pay French taxes… okay, so it’s not all wine and cheese.

So why has it taken nearly two years to get this gem? The short, not-so-sweet answer is The French Government. The long answer is more complicated and requires some explanation of the process.

First comes the visa. And this is very important. You must obtain a visa, regardless of your situation, to enter the country if you plan to stay more than 90 days (for Americans). As soon as you enter the country you must immediately start applying for the carte de sejour. I cannot stress this enough. It take 3 months, at least, to get this document, so you need to start the process as soon as you arrive.

The first carte de sejour is not really a cart de sejour. It’s a sticker in your passport that basically validates your visa and allows you to stay in the country for one year. While there’s lots of paperwork, getting this authorization is not too difficult. But don’t get comfy; the next year they get really strict.

Three months before your one year is complete, you must again start the process for obtaining/renewing the carte de sejour. This time the paperwork is different, and the process is more strict. Now you have to provide proof of your ability to stay in the country: income, proof of residence, proof of marriage (in my case), etc. And it’s not as simple as it sounds. Only certain documents are accepted.

In my case, for example, they wanted to see everything in both names of me and my spouse. I had no idea of this and so had not prepared. I moved to France to marry a man who’s lived his entire life here. Everything was in him name and we saw no need to change that… until we visited the sous-prefecture in Arles. The next few months were a mad scurry to get everything in both names. Warning: nothing happens quickly in France.

In addition, they questioned why I did not have security sociale. Well, the folks as security sociale wanted the carte de sejour. This merry-go-round is very common in the French administration.

Long story, short: it took six months to get the card after the initial visit to the sous-prefecture.

So, finally, I have my piece of pink plastic, and even the sour-puss admin at the sous-prefecture could not squash my enthusiasm. France was now open to me! Then I arrived home to show the card to my husband. The card is marked “temporary.”

And, the issue date is Feb. 26, 2013. The application date is July 1, 2012, and the expiration date is July 1, 2013.

I can rest for one month–paperwork and sous-prefecture-free–and then I get to start the process all over again.

As they say in France, c’est la vie!